November 2013

Evidence on a Sliding Scale

by Jerome Carter on November 27, 2013 · 0 comments

Has anyone else noticed this?  On the Internet, everyone is an expert, and everyone vigorously argues his/her point.  Whenever absolute proof is available to support a point, that proof is offered, upfront, with no hesitation.  However, when the evidence is weaker, a sort of “sliding scale” of why-you-should-believe-me is used to back a position.   No […]

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Those of you who follow along regularly know the importance I place on workflow for everything from EHR design to practice optimization.    Workflow technology is rapidly maturing and deserves consideration for clinical applications.   Clinical decision support is an obvious way to introduce workflow technology into healthcare systems.   However, computerization of guidelines has a long history […]

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Until I began studying discrete math, my idea of a function was something along the lines of formulae such as f(x) = x3, e=mc2, or F=ma.  Very likely, this is true for most people.   Math education from elementary algebra to differential equations focuses on functions that return a real number value.   However, this is a very […]

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Each of the special topic pages on EHR Science has a Key Articles section.   When selecting articles for these sections, I look for papers that provide fundamental insights of some type.  For example, they may be great introductions to a topic, provide a new technical insight, or offer a new method for analyzing a specific […]

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We saw in the last post that taking the Cartesian product of two sets results in a collection of ordered pairs.   Now, we are going to explore how ordered pairs and larger groupings can be used to organize information using relations. Here is the definition of a relation taken from Discrete Mathematics with Applications, by […]

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EHR Data Quality Resources

by Jerome Carter on November 6, 2013 · 0 comments

Now that EHR adoption has increased, data quality issues are receiving more attention.   Unfortunately, data quality is difficult to define.   Weiskopf and Weng make this point exceptionally well in their paper Methods and Dimensions of Electronic Health Record Data Quality Assessment: Enabling Reuse for Clinical Research.   Data quality is the result of a series of […]

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Everything can be expressed as a set—the rooms in a building, the providers in a practice, penicillins—everything.  When one studies the basics of set theory – unions, intersections, subsets and the like—the concepts seem so simple, even obvious, that it is difficult to believe that Georg Cantor  had to dream them up and then convince […]

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