December 2013

Looking to the New Year

by Jerome Carter on December 23, 2013 · 0 comments

This has been a good year.   Other than the startup, everything else has worked out as expected or better.   EHR Science now has the intended complement of topic pages, and in maintaining them, I have forced myself to conduct regular literature searches for each topic.   As a direct consequence, I hope to get the first […]

{ 0 comments }

Is It Time for a Clinical Programming Language?

by Jerome Carter on December 16, 2013 · 2 comments

Programming languages are fascinating to me.   I like seeing how different language designers attempt to solve the same problem.   General programming languages like C are great, but often one can be more productive when the language used is closer in concept to the problem at hand.   Yes, anything can be written in C, but if […]

{ 2 comments }

Designing software, like practicing medicine, is in essence about solving problems.   Patients do not present with a series of multiple-choice answers from which one may select, and complex software systems are never built using stock requirements.   Both activities are as much art as science, and the results vary greatly among practitioners.   Like most people, I […]

{ 0 comments }

Clinical care consists of processes.  Examining patients, prescribing medications, mailing bills, reviewing charts–they are all processes.   Fortunately, there exists a perfectly good way of describing processes mathematically using graphs.  Graph theory originated when Leonhard Euler attempted to solve a simple problem mathematically.  The town of Konigsberg, where he lived, had four land areas that were […]

{ 2 comments }