Back in the mid-90s, doctors who bought EHR systems were trying to solve specific problems.   These early adopters would listen as I listed the many ways that EHR systems would change their lives, acknowledge the issues I raised, then buy an EHR anyway.   More often than not, however,Continue Reading

Cell phones made telephone technology much more useful–no more searching for a phone booth or waiting at home for a call. Cell phones quickly evolved, eventually bringing us the much-loved Blackberry. Blackberry smartphones moved beyond calls to encompass a range of communication modes.  However, despite the gap in features andContinue Reading

The rise of scribes is but one sign that many EHR systems, as currently designed, make clinicians less productive and patient interactions more awkward. The main ways touted by ONC and most observers to address usability issues focus on user-centered design and more comprehensive usability testing.   However, can these methodsContinue Reading

I have dedicated this summer to iOS development.    Having seen how iOS works from the inside, especially the attention given to human interaction guidelines, has increased my appreciation for all that goes into making systems truly usable.   Usability of EHR systems has taken on new importance, and theContinue Reading

My explorations in clinical care system design are progressing well.   In particular, I am pleased with the responses to the posts on primary care and EHR design.  There is a groundswell of interest in better systems that do more to help clinicians with the tasks they find burdensome.  PerhapsContinue Reading

Good user interfaces are hard to create, and unfortunately, the UI often receives less design attention that other aspects of a software system.   Personally, I see this as a developer fatigue issue. After the wrangling with objects, algorithms, APIs, security, and such, it is tempting to slap on a UIContinue Reading